The Resource Establishment of a long-term monitoring network to detect population trends in forest-interior neotropical migrant landbirds : habitat characterization of the monitoring points, by Donald R. Whitehead

Establishment of a long-term monitoring network to detect population trends in forest-interior neotropical migrant landbirds : habitat characterization of the monitoring points, by Donald R. Whitehead

Label
Establishment of a long-term monitoring network to detect population trends in forest-interior neotropical migrant landbirds : habitat characterization of the monitoring points
Title
Establishment of a long-term monitoring network to detect population trends in forest-interior neotropical migrant landbirds
Title remainder
habitat characterization of the monitoring points
Statement of responsibility
by Donald R. Whitehead
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
ISL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Whitehead, Donald R
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Birds
  • Wildlife management
Label
Establishment of a long-term monitoring network to detect population trends in forest-interior neotropical migrant landbirds : habitat characterization of the monitoring points, by Donald R. Whitehead
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "A report submitted to: Special Projects Program, Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program, Indiana Department of Natural Resources."
  • "Sixty monitoring points were established in the Pleasant Run Unit of Hoosier National Forest in 1990 to analyze long-term trends in the breeding populations of forest-interior neotropical migrants. During the summer of 1991 habitat data were gathered from these points. The objectives of this study were to characterize the monitoring points, to see if the three site types (stream, ravines, and ridge crests) separate from one another in multivariate analyses, and to see if local habitat characteristics influence the structure of bird communities. It is evident that the three sites separate well from one another on the basis of general habitat characteristics as well as vegetation structure. The points on intermittent streams are characterized by high herb density, high percent ground cover, high average canopy height, and a woody vegetation demonstrated by hornbeam, ironwood, black walnut, maple, and sycamore. Upper ravine sties are typified by high litter depth, high average diameter of trees >8" dbh and a woody vegetation characterized by red oak, tulip poplar, sugar maple, shagbark hickory, basswood, and black gum. Ridge sites have high densities of trees >12"dbh, and <4" dbh, many standing dead boles, high litter depth, and a woody vegetation dominated by chestnut oak, bitternut hickory, white oak, pignut hickory, sassafras, and flowering dogwood."--Abstract, leaf 1
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
17613861
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
9 pages, 12 unnumbered leaves
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn429079921
Label
Establishment of a long-term monitoring network to detect population trends in forest-interior neotropical migrant landbirds : habitat characterization of the monitoring points, by Donald R. Whitehead
Publication
Note
  • "A report submitted to: Special Projects Program, Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program, Indiana Department of Natural Resources."
  • "Sixty monitoring points were established in the Pleasant Run Unit of Hoosier National Forest in 1990 to analyze long-term trends in the breeding populations of forest-interior neotropical migrants. During the summer of 1991 habitat data were gathered from these points. The objectives of this study were to characterize the monitoring points, to see if the three site types (stream, ravines, and ridge crests) separate from one another in multivariate analyses, and to see if local habitat characteristics influence the structure of bird communities. It is evident that the three sites separate well from one another on the basis of general habitat characteristics as well as vegetation structure. The points on intermittent streams are characterized by high herb density, high percent ground cover, high average canopy height, and a woody vegetation demonstrated by hornbeam, ironwood, black walnut, maple, and sycamore. Upper ravine sties are typified by high litter depth, high average diameter of trees >8" dbh and a woody vegetation characterized by red oak, tulip poplar, sugar maple, shagbark hickory, basswood, and black gum. Ridge sites have high densities of trees >12"dbh, and <4" dbh, many standing dead boles, high litter depth, and a woody vegetation dominated by chestnut oak, bitternut hickory, white oak, pignut hickory, sassafras, and flowering dogwood."--Abstract, leaf 1
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
17613861
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
9 pages, 12 unnumbered leaves
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn429079921

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