The Resource Ecology of the endangered copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, and associated herpetofauna, in northeastern Indiana, by Bruce A. Kingsbury

Ecology of the endangered copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, and associated herpetofauna, in northeastern Indiana, by Bruce A. Kingsbury

Label
Ecology of the endangered copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, and associated herpetofauna, in northeastern Indiana
Title
Ecology of the endangered copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, and associated herpetofauna, in northeastern Indiana
Statement of responsibility
by Bruce A. Kingsbury
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
ISL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kingsbury, Bruce A
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Nerodia
  • Reptiles
  • Endangered species
  • Snakes
Label
Ecology of the endangered copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, and associated herpetofauna, in northeastern Indiana, by Bruce A. Kingsbury
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "A special projects research project report."
  • "August 1995."
  • "Submitted to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife nongame and endangered wildlife program."
  • "The copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, is currently listed as threatened or endangered in the states of Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan, and is proposed for listing as threatened at the Federal level. A disjunct population of this subspecies exists in northeastern Indiana, extreme northwestern Ohio, and south-central Michigan. Using radiotelemetry, I monitored the behavior of four snakes from this population structure to establish the basic ecology of the species. While the copperbelly is a natricine water snake, the use of terrestrial habitats in addition to wetlands was striking. Observations of snakes in water were rare for all snakes in the summer, and in one case the only time an individual was found in a wetland was at initial capture. The preferred upland habitat is [the] boundary between forest and field, or in openings in the forest, where sunlight, cover, and potential prey are all available. The protection of these snakes and associated herpetofauna would thus appear to depend on the protection of not only appropriate wetlands, but suitable adjacent upland areas as well"--Abstract, leaf 2
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
17617203
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
19 leaves
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn436866863
Label
Ecology of the endangered copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, and associated herpetofauna, in northeastern Indiana, by Bruce A. Kingsbury
Publication
Note
  • "A special projects research project report."
  • "August 1995."
  • "Submitted to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife nongame and endangered wildlife program."
  • "The copperbelly water snake, Nerodia erythrogaster neglecta, is currently listed as threatened or endangered in the states of Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan, and is proposed for listing as threatened at the Federal level. A disjunct population of this subspecies exists in northeastern Indiana, extreme northwestern Ohio, and south-central Michigan. Using radiotelemetry, I monitored the behavior of four snakes from this population structure to establish the basic ecology of the species. While the copperbelly is a natricine water snake, the use of terrestrial habitats in addition to wetlands was striking. Observations of snakes in water were rare for all snakes in the summer, and in one case the only time an individual was found in a wetland was at initial capture. The preferred upland habitat is [the] boundary between forest and field, or in openings in the forest, where sunlight, cover, and potential prey are all available. The protection of these snakes and associated herpetofauna would thus appear to depend on the protection of not only appropriate wetlands, but suitable adjacent upland areas as well"--Abstract, leaf 2
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
17617203
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
19 leaves
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn436866863

Library Locations

    • Indiana State LibraryBorrow it
      315 W. Ohio St., Indianapolis, IN, 46202, US
      39.77004 -86.164015

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