The Resource Assessment of bald eagle habitat in Indiana, prepared by John S. Castrale

Assessment of bald eagle habitat in Indiana, prepared by John S. Castrale

Label
Assessment of bald eagle habitat in Indiana
Title
Assessment of bald eagle habitat in Indiana
Statement of responsibility
prepared by John S. Castrale
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
ISL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Castrale, John S
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Wildlife management
  • Wildlife conservation
  • Endangered species
  • Bald eagle
  • Birds of prey
Label
Assessment of bald eagle habitat in Indiana, prepared by John S. Castrale
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "Final Report."
  • "Grantee: Indiana Division of Fish and Wildlife."
  • "Project No.: E-I-7 endangered species program."
  • "Study No.: 24."
  • "Period covered: 1 October 1991 -- 31 January 1995."
  • "Approved by Catherine Gremillion-Smith, Nongame Supervisor."
  • "Date: 3 February 1995."
  • "Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were surveyed by helicopter on selected waterways in Indiana from late November - early April during the winters of 1991-92 and 1992-93. During the 1991-92 period, 653 bald eagles were tallied on 9 surveys and 968 eagles were detected on 11 surveys during the latter period. Peak counts during both years occurred from late January through February. Greatest concentrations of eagles along rivers occurred on the Upper Wabash River (from Warren to Parke counties). Moderate concentrations were found on sections of Sugar Creek, the East and West forks of the White River and the lower Wabash/Ohio rivers in Posey County. Few eagles were observed on the Ohio River in Harrison and Perry counties. Monroe and Patoka lakes supported greater numbers of eagles than other lakes, but after adjusting for size, concentrations were greatest at Lake Gallimore, a small lake with an eagle's nest present. Variables measured to characterize habitat features and disturbance factors on surveyed segments did a poor job of explaining eagle abundance on rivers. Only 21% of the variability in eagle abundance was explained by a regression model and strongest correlations were between the degree of forest-water edge and a negative relationship with intermittent creek mouths. For lakes, a regression model did a much better job (r2 = 0.58) of explaining eagle concentrations. Eagle abundance was most strongly associated with the amount of shallow water, forest area, and the presence of eagle nests"--Abstract, p. 1
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
17617191
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
48 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn436765321
Label
Assessment of bald eagle habitat in Indiana, prepared by John S. Castrale
Publication
Note
  • "Final Report."
  • "Grantee: Indiana Division of Fish and Wildlife."
  • "Project No.: E-I-7 endangered species program."
  • "Study No.: 24."
  • "Period covered: 1 October 1991 -- 31 January 1995."
  • "Approved by Catherine Gremillion-Smith, Nongame Supervisor."
  • "Date: 3 February 1995."
  • "Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were surveyed by helicopter on selected waterways in Indiana from late November - early April during the winters of 1991-92 and 1992-93. During the 1991-92 period, 653 bald eagles were tallied on 9 surveys and 968 eagles were detected on 11 surveys during the latter period. Peak counts during both years occurred from late January through February. Greatest concentrations of eagles along rivers occurred on the Upper Wabash River (from Warren to Parke counties). Moderate concentrations were found on sections of Sugar Creek, the East and West forks of the White River and the lower Wabash/Ohio rivers in Posey County. Few eagles were observed on the Ohio River in Harrison and Perry counties. Monroe and Patoka lakes supported greater numbers of eagles than other lakes, but after adjusting for size, concentrations were greatest at Lake Gallimore, a small lake with an eagle's nest present. Variables measured to characterize habitat features and disturbance factors on surveyed segments did a poor job of explaining eagle abundance on rivers. Only 21% of the variability in eagle abundance was explained by a regression model and strongest correlations were between the degree of forest-water edge and a negative relationship with intermittent creek mouths. For lakes, a regression model did a much better job (r2 = 0.58) of explaining eagle concentrations. Eagle abundance was most strongly associated with the amount of shallow water, forest area, and the presence of eagle nests"--Abstract, p. 1
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
17617191
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
48 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn436765321

Library Locations

    • Indiana State LibraryBorrow it
      315 W. Ohio St., Indianapolis, IN, 46202, US
      39.77004 -86.164015

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